Speed Reading For Education

7 Speed Reading EDU is the world's most advanced accelerated reading system for schools. Based on proven principles of faster reading, 7 Speed Reading EDU contains all the features of 7 Speed Reading plus:

The next step is to see 7 Speed Reading for yourself. Simply fill out the form and we'll send you a free no obligation trial of the full version of 7 Speed Reading EDU.

On the pro side it has easy-to-use interface, video tutorials, multiple user accounts, well-structured course system for beginners & advanced students plus the ability to exercise with any digital text.

speedreadingtechniques.org

7 Speed Reading is an excellent way for anyone to start increasing their reading speed today. It’s suitable for all ages and professions or motivations. If you like to read more effectively this tutor is ready to teach you how.

typinglounge.com

7 Speed Reading is a decent speed reading software with an innovative approach. The customizable features are quite appealing since it allows you organize your speed reading training effectively.

courselounge.com

What does a good speed-reading software have to have? It should have guided training lessons, large libraries of texts, and have comprehensive progress reports. That being said, 7 Speed Reading is currently a very good choice, as it has been for a while.

etondigital.com

If you want to learn how to speed read so that you can read everything faster, your best option is to get the self-paced speed reading course called 7 Speed Reading. It is designed to be the world’s most powerful speed-reading training program.

winningspirit.com

From learning how to read and comprehend faster to how to keep your eyes healthy, everything is covered in this course for almost any age, and a team of professionals will help you master it.

bestadvisor.com

I liked the accessibility of it. It helps, because users are able to easily maneuver throughout the software to varying levels and practice their reading at varying speeds.

Stephen L. (Reviewer)

After having used this software, I learned techniques and skills such as eliminating my subvocalization, which not only greatly enhanced my speed reading, but also allowed me to get more engagement in what I read.

Devad Goud (7 Speed Reading User)

The biggest problem I had was sub-vocalization, 7 Speed Reading helped a lot with techniques to improve this and substantially improve my reading speed. The application is easy to use with loads of books to read to improve your reading skills.

Reinard Mortlock
(7 Speed Reading User)

When I seriously exercise using the app, in no time, my reading speed goes from less than 400 to 600 and my target is 900 plus.

Adel Serag (7 Speed Reading User)

The pace trainer is great for getting my eyes focused and sharp. Also the word search exercise is very important, gets me searching for specific text.

Nik Roglich (7 Speed Reading User)

I have improved my speed reading and comprehension since I started using 7 Speed Reading, I enjoy using it and I will continue to use it in the future.

Jose Godinez (7 Speed Reading User)

Feb
28th

It Happens Every Four Years – And It Happened 2 Years

Categories: Uncategorized |

2016 was a leap year, and that means we had an extra day in February. This only happens every four years, so it is customary for people to celebrate in different ways on February 29. But many people are unaware of how this curious custom started.

Why do we have a leap year every four years in the first place?

To answer this question we need to go a few hundred years back. For the sun to make a full circle around our planet it takes 365 days plus a little more – about five to six hours.

But as you already know, the Gregorian Calendar (the calendar used by most countries as a calendar system) only contains 365 days spread out over 12 months. So what happens to that one-third of an hour?

You’re already figuring it out, I can tell. It takes three years for this 0.24 of a day to make up a whole day. We add an extra day to February every fourth year to make up for this discrepancy.

Why does it matter?

Calendars have one goal: to ensure people can properly understand and predict the seasons and the weather. If we were to omit adding one day every four years, eventually the seasons would not be in sync with our calendars.

On paper it would say May, but in terms of seasonal temperatures, it might feel like August or December, depending on how out of synch it was that year. Imagine the chaos!

If you’re a bit of a history nerd you’ll love this. Back in the days of the Roman Empire the calendar had only 355 days. To account for those extra days that the sun needed to complete its orbit, the Romans use to add a whole month – yes, a whole month – to their calendars every two years.

But when Julius Caesar became emperor of Rome in the 1st century AD, he decided that he wanted a more straightforward system. That’s when Sosigenes, the astronomer Caesar employed, created the Julian calendar, with 365 days in normal years and 366 days every fourth year.

But wait – we don’t use the Julian calendar today!

That’s because for some people, even this Julian adjustment wasn’t enough. About five hundred years later, the Gregorian calendar was created to account for a much smaller (0.002%) discrepancy.

It was a change driven by the needs of the Roman Catholic Church, which decreed that the Easter celebrations were to be held on or close to the spring equinox (end of March).

After five centuries of observing the Julian Calendar, Easter was getting farther and farther from the spring equinox, something the Church was not happy with. That’s why Pope Gregory XIII introduced the Gregorian Calendar. It was first adopted by Catholic countries in Europe, and eventually by most countries around the world, as a way to make international trade and communication more convenient.

Why the extra day is added to February and not another month?

This is a question many people have. Today, every other month has 30 or 31 days – but this was not always the case.

When Julius Caesar was emperor, July – the month named after him – had 31 days and August had 29. When Caesar Augustus succeeded Julius Caesar, he too wanted the month named after him (August) to have more than just 29 days. So he borrowed two days from February.

It’s good to be king! (Or emperor, in this case.)