How To Overcome the Fear of Public Speaking

Did you know that “fear of speaking in public” is usually listed as one of the top ten things that people fear the most, and often rates higher than snakes, heights, being trapped, or even dying? Imagine, feeling as if you’d rather be dead than get up in front of ten or twenty or a hundred people to give a speech or presentation. If that’s your top fear, then rather than going to that extreme, why don’t you try one of these techniques to become a better speaker?

Improve your memory. When people have nightmares about speaking in public, they generally imagine getting up on stage and then completely forgetting what they were going to say. If you’ve trained your memory well, you won’t need to worry about that. You’ll be able to effortlessly deliver the speech you’ve prepared. What’s more, you’ll have in your brain all of the information you need to answer any impromptu questions from the audience. When you can rely on your memory, you’ll have the confidence you need to get over your fear of public speaking.

Improve your vocabulary. Another common nightmare about public speaking is stammering, stuttering, fumbling over words, rather than being able to smoothly deliver a polished presentation. If you’ve got a great vocabulary, then you’ll never lack the words you need to express yourself fluently and eloquently. In addition, you’ll be able to tailor your speech to that specific audience in front of you so that you achieve the best possible communication. When you can rely on a powerful vocabulary skill, you’ll know you can give a speech with ease.

Learn to speed read. A large part of giving a speech or presentation is preparing for it in advance, and that requires research and knowledge. If you’re an excellent speed reader then you’ll be able to go through all the materials more quickly, leaving you more time to prepare and polish the speech itself. If you can save even half an hour by your skill at speed reading, that’s an extra half an hour you’ll have to put the final touches on your speech. Better yet, you can use that half an hour to relax before your presentation – and that will help calm any last fears you might have.